Switzerlands latest News Headlines

Nes headline

 Click on the links to read the full stories

 

  • Tue, 18 Dec 2018 10:00:00 +0000: Multinationals must step up game to attract top business students - Top news - SWI swissinfo.ch
    Millennials at leading Swiss business schools say it will take more than a good salary to recruit and retain them. They want jobs with purpose, flexibility, and above all, the opportunity for impact. There has been a lot of talk about how millennials (people born between 1983 and 1994) and Gen Zs (born between 1995 and 1999) want more than money and a 9 to 5 job. Various surveys and media reports suggest that, globally and in Switzerland, younger generations are searching for jobs with meaning and rejecting big multinationals as symbols of the rigid, profit-driven corporate structures they are trying to escape. But, the picture is more nuanced if you talk to millennial-age students at top business schools in Switzerland – a group that is highly sought-after by large multinationals. They say the era of multinationals isn't over but they are expecting more from them. The search for purpose and authenticity Dominique Gobat, a career services manager at the University St ...
  • Tue, 18 Dec 2018 09:30:00 +0000: Solar taxi driver still pushing for renewables - Top news - SWI swissinfo.ch
    The man who drove the SOLARTAXI around the world ten years ago thinks that renewables aren’t gaining ground quickly enough. On December 18, 2008, former Swiss schoolteacher Louis Palmer enjoyed a hero’s welcome when he drove his SOLARTAXI back to Lucerne – 18 months, 38 countries and 53,451 kilometres after setting out in the blue-and-white car powered solely by solar energy. What’s changed since that day? “On the one hand, there have been some big changes – like the growing popularity of electric cars. There’s been more investment in renewables and clean tech, and there’s more awareness of global warming than ever before,” Palmer told swissinfo.ch. “But at the same time there’s also more pollution than ever before.” Just days after 190 nations agreed on the rules for implementing the Paris Agreement, Palmer is dissatisfied with climate action. “It’s great that so many countries were talking at COP24, but we need more immediate action. What we need to do is ban cutting down ...
  • Tue, 18 Dec 2018 08:55:00 +0000: Direct democracy vs. France’s street protesters - Top news - SWI swissinfo.ch
    Recent protests by France’s “gilets jaunes” or yellow vests (so named after the fluorescent jackets kept in all vehicles in France) obtained changes from the government, but there are important differences with Switzerland’s system of direct democracy, writes Daniel Warner. The recent protests by the gilets jaunes in France would seem to have all the elements of direct democracy. For several Saturdays, thousands of citizens protested in the streets throughout France against the government, initially against an increase in the tax on diesel fuel. And they were successful. French President Emmanuel Macron suspended the gas tax increase as well as acceding to several other demands of the protesters.  Switzerland prides itself on its system of direct democracy. Referendums and initiatives are fundamental parts of the Swiss political system. Citizens can annul legislation passed by their representatives in Bern. Direct democracy can overrule indirect democracy through the expressed ...
  • Mon, 17 Dec 2018 16:00:00 +0000: Study examines health of Geneva’s undocumented migrants - Top news - SWI swissinfo.ch
    Little by little, Geneva is discovering more about the thousands of undocumented immigrants thought to be in the region. The initial results of a four-year study into the health and living conditions of illegal and regularised migrants have some important early findings.  Around 76,000 illegal immigrants are believed to be living in Switzerland (see infobox below). Of these, canton Geneva is home to 13,000. In 2015, the local and federal authorities launched a unique pilot scheme, known as Operation Papyrus, that looks set to grant around 2,000 long-term undocumented migrants in Geneva official resident permits when it concludes at the end of this year.  In parallel to the launch of Papyrus, a team of researchers, led by the University of Geneva, initiated a four-year study into the living conditions of illegal immigrants in Geneva and the impact of the regularisation process. They interviewed 450 undocumented migrants – 300 of whom benefited from the Papyrus scheme.  One year ...
  • Mon, 17 Dec 2018 09:19:00 +0000: COP24: Text adopted, ambitions abandoned - Top news - SWI swissinfo.ch
    Representatives of 190 countries attending the COP24 climate summit in Katowice accepted the rules for implementing the Paris Agreement, which limits global warming to less than 2˚C. But to achieve this result, it took a lot of negotiation and patience, as the delegates of the Swiss Youth for Climate observed. It is Thursday, the second week of COP24, and nothing has been happening for hours. We are waiting in a room far from the crowd. The negotiators finally snatch a moment of respite and use the opportunity to crash on a sofa or on the floor. They are recovering from a short night and long day of talks.  Suddenly, the new texts are published. The negotiators are waking up. A murmur runs through the corridors of the conference centre we refer to as the capital. What margin is there for manoeuvre? What are the points that can be conceded? Which ones are worth fighting for? We observe the delegations returning to the negotiation rooms. Unfortunately, as civil society observers, ...
  • Mon, 17 Dec 2018 07:55:00 +0000: How scientists are redefining success - Top news - SWI swissinfo.ch
    University rankings, journal impact factor, citation counts: some argue that these methods of measuring the 'best' science are outdated and even a hindrance to scientific progress. Switzerland wants to help implement alternatives – a task easier said than done. According to a recent report by the Swiss Sci­ence Council (SSC), scientific activities – whether it’s the employment of researchers, the publication of papers, or public and private investment – have grown significantly in recent decades. This growth, in turn, has resulted in unprecedented levels of competition when it comes to funding, prizes, academic positions, spots in top journals, and other trappings of scientific success. With the increased pressure to “publish or perish”, more and more importance has been placed on quantitative measures of scientific success [see box] – often focused on publication citations and journal impact factor – which can boost researchers’ incentive to publish even more. Common science ...
  • Mon, 17 Dec 2018 07:47:00 +0000: Novartis weighs reinsurance tie-up to fund ultra-expensive drugs - Top news - SWI swissinfo.ch
    Swiss drugmaker Novartis is exploring working with the global reinsurance industry to help health systems bear the cost of a new generation of personalised therapies as the industry comes under pressure to devise funding models for ultra-expensive medicines. Vas Narasimhan, chief executive of Novartis, said the company was “brainstorming” alternative financing possibilities for drugs that offer the prospect of curing patients of once-fatal diseases, potentially saving substantial healthcare costs down the line — but requiring enormous upfront outlays. These options could include a “reinsurance model” in which a third party underwrites “the catastrophic case of a child having one of these conditions”, Narasimhan told the Financial Times. Such deals could prove attractive for the insurance and pharmaceuticals industries. Novartis and other drugmakers are betting increasingly on specialised cell and gene therapies as future growth drivers — despite their eye-wateringly high costs. ...
  • Sun, 16 Dec 2018 10:00:00 +0000: ‘Being Swiss is an essential part of my identity’ - Top news - SWI swissinfo.ch
    Even as a child, François Schwalb, who was born in South Africa, was interested in his father’s homeland. Today the 30-year-old, who works in the fruit and vegetable industry, lives with his family and numerous animals. You weren’t born in Switzerland. Why are you Swiss? I was born in South Africa to a Swiss father in 1988. We lived in Switzerland when I was 7-9 years old. We also visited in 2008 and again in 2018. After the last trip with my wife and one-year-old son, we plan to visit family and friends in Switzerland at least every two years. What kind of relationship do you have with Switzerland? Being Swiss is an essential part of my identity, of how I see and understand myself, my parents and siblings. I’m very interested in many aspects of the country and read up a lot on a weekly basis – and the more I read, the more I love Switzerland. When did you start to feel Swiss? Why are you interested in Switzerland? Since I can remember, Switzerland has been part of our ...
  • Sat, 15 Dec 2018 16:00:00 +0000: Transport, terrorism, and dual-nationals - Top news - SWI swissinfo.ch
    Almost every article published by swissinfo.ch contains a percentage, an age, an amount of money or some other figure. Here’s a round-up of the most interesting statistics to appear in the past week’s stories. Monday 4.6 million The number of vehicles in Switzerland, according to the Federal Statistical Office. With a population of around 8 million, this makes more than one car for every two inhabitants, and a hefty contribution to the environment; in 2016, transport (excluding international flights) accounted for 38% of Swiss carbon emissions.  Tuesday 2 Following a decision in Parliament, the question of cabinet ministers holding two (or more) passports was brought to a close, with politicians deciding that multiple nationalities is fine. The vote came after a debate last year in which some claimed that more than one nationality could lead to divided loyalties.  Wednesday 3 Terrorist gunman Cherif Chekatt killed three and injured 12 others when he opened fire at the ...
  • Sat, 15 Dec 2018 10:00:00 +0000: Switzerland after sundown - Top news - SWI swissinfo.ch
    By day, photographer Dominic Büttner works with light to capture the best shots for his clients. By night, however, he seeks out darker corners, as his Dreamscapes project shows. Büttner, who works for various well-known Swiss companies and organisations, is until now the only photographer – along with his colleague Béatrice Devènes – to have twice take the official annual photo of the Swiss government. When the sun sets, Büttner moves onto other things. He seeks out “non-places”, places we don’t even notice during the day. In darkness, he sets up his equipment, hits the automatic button, and walks off into his own picture, lamp in hand. But of the photographer himself, all that we are left with is a ghost-like pair of boots. With these paintings of light, we are never sure if we are in a wonderful new land, or if we are in a nightmare. Casting shadows Büttner has also found dreamlike backdrops in Japan, Germany, and Italy. But his non-places are always that – non-places, ...
  • Fri, 14 Dec 2018 16:00:00 +0000: Where Swiss development aid meets migration - Top news - SWI swissinfo.ch
    Controversial and currently on hold in Switzerland, the UN Migration Pact strives to help people live in peace and follow their dreams in their own countries. But many Swiss-supported projects already pursue these goals. Earlier this week the international community - but not Switzerland - formally adopted an international agreement in Morocco that promises a better, more coordinated approach to migration. The Swiss government said on Friday that it had instructed the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs to prepare, by the end of 2019, a simple federal decree enabling the Swiss parliament to decide whether or not Switzerland should sign the pact. The country already supports several key projects in the area of migration. It has formed five partnerships with Bosnia-Herzegovina, Kosovo, Nigeria, Serbia, Sri Lanka and Tunisia. The content of a migration partnership is flexible and varies from country to country, taking the particular context and the different interests of the ...
  • Fri, 14 Dec 2018 14:25:00 +0000: Switzerland sets legal foundations for blockchain industry - Top news - SWI swissinfo.ch
    The Swiss government has announced a wide-ranging blockchain strategy that aims to create a legal foundation for the new technology. The reports suggests amending existing laws, rather than creating new legislation, in a bid to enhance Switzerland’s status as a blockchain-friendly country. The main focus of the strategy is to incorporate decentralised digital tokens into the Swiss business infrastructure, particularly the financial sector. One proposal is to clear away regulatory hurdles for trading securities (such as shares, bonds or real estate) on blockchain platforms. This would create a new regulatory category along the lines of recent fintech laws, which allow certain financial activities to be carried out by tech start-ups without a banking license. Switzerland has rapidly established itself as one of the world’s leading blockchain hubs, attracting both start-ups and hundreds of millions of dollars in investments. The technology, which started off as a means to replace ...
  • Fri, 14 Dec 2018 10:00:00 +0000: Do we need clinics for internet and sex addicts? - Top news - SWI swissinfo.ch
    One in ten people in Switzerland suffers from some form of behavioural addiction: they cannot live without the internet, gambling, sex or shopping. An expert from the new Centre for Dependency Disorders in Basel gives his view on the issue. Hours and hours spent playing on the computer or searching for porn, excessive sexual behaviour or the irrepressible impulse to buy - it seems that in many cases, the internet and modern society are to blame. + Why the WHO recognised video games addiction as a disease To tackle these ‘new’ disorders, the Basel University Psychiatric Clinics have opened Switzerland’s first clinic specialised in the inpatient treatment of behavioural addictions. “With this service we are entering a new field,” says clinic director Gerhard Wiesbeck. swissinfo.ch: I spend hours watching television and check my mobile phone dozens of times a day. Does this mean I am addicted? Gerhard Wiesbeck: We should not confuse a bad habit or passion, for instance for ...
  • Thu, 13 Dec 2018 16:00:00 +0000: Tale of Swiss-based Syrian torture survivor highlights Dublin flaws - Top news - SWI swissinfo.ch
    Jalal last saw his youngest son was when the boy was a baby. Now Hamude is almost five. The asylum seeker from Syria is caught up in a complicated international case based on the Dublin accord, a regulation that Switzerland applies more strictly than any other country in Europe, according to critics.  Jalal has been living in limbo, unable to plan more than a few months in advance, since 2014. “I spent five years in a Syrian prison and now I have spent [almost] another five years in an open prison,” Jalal told swissinfo.ch in November.   The father leads an isolated life in a tiny studio on the outskirts of Lucerne in central Switzerland. Hamude, along with his mother and two siblings, live equally isolated in a rundown caravan camp a couple thousand kilometres away in Greece. Their relationship unfolds largely over Whatsapp. Living with no sense of when or where they will all see each other again has both parents on the edge of a nervous breakdown. Despite the efforts of ...
  • Thu, 13 Dec 2018 15:48:00 +0000: OK Google: what the Swiss search for - Top news - SWI swissinfo.ch
    Football, football and football, in particular the Swiss national squad is what the Swiss looked for, due to it's appearance - and at times questionable performance - at the 2018 World Cup.  Top spot went to Swiss star, Xherdan Shaqiri, who was in the spotlight for celebrating a victory over Serbia by making hand gestures of an Albanian national symbol, the double eagle. Second position went to Swiss coach Vladimir Petkovic. Switzerland now has royalty, at least as far as sports are concerned, when footballer Valon Behrami married ski star Lara Gut. The bride came fourth (second to the groom). She now speeds down the slopes burdened with a multisyllabic name, Lara Gut-Behrami. Still gut, German speakers may wonder. Fifth position went to still single Adela Smajic, the daughter of former professional footballer, Admir Smajic. Adela starred in the reality TV show, Bachelor. Controversial academic Tariq Ramadan was the sixth most searched person by the Swiss this ...
® SwitzerlandinEnglish.ch Frontier Theme